HomeDevelopment£100M Liverpool Baltic Triangle Second Phase given seal of approval

£100M Liverpool Baltic Triangle Second Phase given seal of approval

Baltic Village

The hotel will be clad in mirrored glass to reflect the imposing South Quay Warehouse it will face.Developers Fountain Trustees and Hurst Street Ltd said the project would create a “new gateway to the city”, but heritage campaigners said they feared it was another plan which would detract from the majesty of Liverpool’s iconic World Heritage Site waterfront.Developer Jonathan Pritchard, addressing yesterday’s planning committee, said: “Despite the worst possible time to be building, we have successfully completed the first part of a comprehensive regeneration of this area with investment of up to £47m.“Our proposal builds on the original vision supported in 2008 to develop a mixed-use scheme of leisure, commercial and residential. It will be established firmly within the heritage of the area and we have worked closely with planning officers to bring this proposal forward.“We are very proud to be a part of the growth of the area and to be able to reflect our passion for the architecture in the Baltic Triangle area.“We are committed to the success of the creative quarter of the city.”The application represents the second phase of the project. In April last year, the Cleveland Square-based company completed a hotel in Hurst Street, which is operated by Hampton, part of the Hilton group.The first phase was worth around £47m, with the second valued at around £50m.While the development does not include any “affordable” housing – which raised objections from the deputy leader of the council Cllr Paul Brant and neighbourhoods cabinet member Cllr Steve Munby – it will have 12 units to be managed by care specialist Leonard Cheshire Homes and 30 sheltered accommodation units for the over-55s.Mr Pritchard added: “Everyone talks about the city being a young place but it is important to have provision for all age groups.”Veteran heritage campaigner Florence Gersten, from the Save Our City campaign, objected to the plan, adding it would “spoil some important views of the city” which are “already fatally compromised”.She added: “For example, [it will affect] the cathedral and some other fine buildings.“This will not only affect residents but visitors to the city.“We are in danger of going back to the days when you could only get a view of the cathedral from the other side of the river.”Miss Gersten added that while the development promised to open up views of the One Park West apartments in Liverpool One, that development was “widely disliked” and would be “better being concealed”.The application was approved unanimously.
The second phase of the £100m regeneration of the Baltic Triangle area of Liverpool city centre was approved by councillors on the 7th June 2011.

The development, including a 219-bedroom hotel and 93 apartments built up to 10 storeys, will also see the relocation of the Youth Hostel Association building and a new gallery and exhibition space off Wapping.

The hotel will be clad in mirrored glass to reflect the imposing South Quay Warehouse it will face.

Developers Fountain Trustees and Hurst Street Ltd said the project would create a “new gateway to the city”, but heritage campaigners said they feared it was another plan which would detract from the majesty of Liverpool’s iconic World Heritage Site waterfront.

Developer Jonathan Pritchard, addressing yesterday’s planning committee, said: “Despite the worst possible time to be building, we have successfully completed the first part of a comprehensive regeneration of this area with investment of up to £47m.

“Our proposal builds on the original vision supported in 2008 to develop a mixed-use scheme of leisure, commercial and residential. It will be established firmly within the heritage of the area and we have worked closely with planning officers to bring this proposal forward.

“We are very proud to be a part of the growth of the area and to be able to reflect our passion for the architecture in the Baltic Triangle area.

“We are committed to the success of the creative quarter of the city.”
The application represents the second phase of the project. In April last year, the Cleveland Square-based company completed a hotel in Hurst Street, which is operated by Hampton, part of the Hilton group.
The first phase was worth around £47m, with the second valued at around £50m.

While the development does not include any “affordable” housing – which raised objections from the deputy leader of the council Cllr Paul Brant and neighbourhoods cabinet member Cllr Steve Munby – it will have 12 units to be managed by care specialist Leonard Cheshire Homes and 30 sheltered accommodation units for the over-55s.

Mr Pritchard added: “Everyone talks about the city being a young place but it is important to have provision for all age groups.”

Veteran heritage campaigner Florence Gersten, from the Save Our City campaign, objected to the plan, adding it would “spoil some important views of the city” which are “already fatally compromised”.
She added: “For example, [it will affect] the cathedral and some other fine buildings.

“This will not only affect residents but visitors to the city.

“We are in danger of going back to the days when you could only get a view of the cathedral from the other side of the river.”

Miss Gersten added that while the development promised to open up views of the One Park West apartments in Liverpool One, that development was “widely disliked” and would be “better being concealed”.

The application was approved unanimously.

Written by

<p>Communications Director for Baltic Triangle CIC and Managing Director of Easytech</p>

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